RSS Google+Author Archive for Benjamin

Benjamin Hunting is a freelance automotive writer who has been involved in racing, restoring and writing about cars and trucks for more than a decade. In his spare time he enjoys keeping the shiny side up on track days. You can find out more about Benjamin’s writing at his website, http://www.benjaminhunting.com.

Ask Doug Thorley – Short vs. Long Tube Headers

We have been having an email conversation with Jamie Joyce, who manages Automotive R & D for Doug Thorley headers. In our previous post we got some interesting background information on the differences between Doug Thorley headers and a stock Toyota Tundra exhaust manifold. This time, we’ll get a chance to hear some of Jamie’s answers regarding the thorny issue of short tube headers versus long tube headers in the pickup truck world.

Short tube headers vs. long tube headers

We started out by mentioning to Jamie that both the short and long tube header options offered by Doug Thorley appeared to offer a similar increase in low-end torque, with only a slight advantage going to the long tube units. This seemed to go against the conventional wisdom in the truck performance world that short tube headers can actually rob an engine of low rpm torque, especially in comparison to stock manifold designs.

Jamie told us that historically,

Ask Doug Thorley – Headers, Flow and Power Gains Over Stock

Doug Thorley is a respected name in the headers business, having honed its reputation over 50 years as a brand that can be counted on for excellent quality, factory fit and durability. In addition to building after market headers for a wide range of vehicles – including the Toyota Tundra – Doug Thorley Headers has also served as an OEM manufacturer for Suzuki of America, Honda’s AMA superbike race team, Kawasaki of America and even TRD, amongst others.

We interviewed Jamie Joyce, the Automotive R & D Manager for Doug Thorley Headers, last week in order to ask some questions about general questions about headers, and specifically how they can help improve the Tundra’s performance.

Ask Unichip: Tuners For The Tundra 4.6 and 4.0?

Not all wrenching on the Toyota Tundra gets done with an actual wrench. The complex computer systems that manage the Tundra’s engine are a ripe source for unlocking extra horsepower. Somewhat conservatively-tuned from the factory, the Tundra has attracted attention from aftermarket chip manufacturers and programmers intent on squeezing every last drop of potential from the vehicle’s drivetrain. However, only Unichip offers a tuner for the Tundra.

Toyota Tundra unichip tuner

The first part of our interview with Unichip

We were given the opportunity to interview Jack Friedman from Unichip, one of the authorities in ECU tuning. Unichip has been in business for more than 15 years, and during that time the company has maintained a strong presence supporting the many different engines offered in the Tundra. Jack provided us with an almost overwhelming amount of information concerning the ins and outs of Tundra tuning, and we’ll be sharing that info in a series of posts that should help Toyota Tundra owners get a better understanding of the ECU tuning process.

ReadyLift SST 3-inch Lift Kit for the Toyota Tundra

There are no shortage of lift kit options for the Toyota Tundra. The Tundra – like most Toyotas – is quite popular amongst off-roaders and those who just like the look of a lifted truck. Not all lift kits are created equal, however, which is why we take notice when one comes along that claims to be the “only complete kit on the market.” When you see that kind of claim, it makes sense to investigate.

ReadyLift SST 3-inch Lift Kit

While the ReadyLift 3.0-inch SST Suspension Lift System for the 2007-2010 Tundra is NOT the “only” complete lift kit on the market, it certainly does seem as though ReadyLift has thought of everything.

Vehicle Stability Control – Pros and Cons

One of the most passionate debates in the world of automotive technology is the effect that electronic driving aids (such as stability control and traction control) have had on the average level of driving skill across the country over the past ten years. There are those who applaud the efforts of car companies to come up with systems that react to changing road conditions more quickly than a human ever could, thus preventing a potential accident. On the other side of the fence are people who lament the fact that many drivers have come to rely on these electronic nannies and have let their own abilities behind the wheel atrophy as a result – a state of affairs that could prove fatal should this technology ever fail when it is needed most.

VSC pros and cons

Here’s some more info about one of these systems – VSC – and a break-down of each side of the argument:

Page 17 of 19« First...10...1516171819